stunningpicture:
Eerie photo of the Yellow Brick Road from an abandoned Wizard of Oz theme park in North Carolina.

stunningpicture:

Eerie photo of the Yellow Brick Road from an abandoned Wizard of Oz theme park in North Carolina.

These are taken from the abandon Takakonuma Greenland Park of Japan. The park opened in 1973 and shut down only after two years of service; common lore says that the rides were due to many accidental deaths. It was reopened in 1986 and closed thirteen years later. The park is not located on any maps and is now surrounded by radiation due to the Fukushima meltdown after the tsunami.

are2:

The Simpsons painted at Chernobyl
[Video]

(Source: drugcabinet)

Spectacular Abandoned Theatres and Cinemas of the Northeastern United States

Any venue designed for the entertainment of hundreds, or even thousands, of people in a single viewing is bound feel rather spooky once the crowds have despersed. Disused theatres and movie palaces are among the most mysterious abandoned buildings, and thanks to the advent of television and multiplexes, they exist in abundance. While their faded elegance makes for a melancholy scene, their vibrant colours and peeling grandeur offer a spectacular subject for photographers like Matt Lambros who captured these stunning images.

Abandoned architecture has fascinated me since I was five years old. My grandmother used to take my brother and I in to investigate any old barn she happened to drive past. She was curious about what was left behind, and her inquisitive nature made a lasting impression on me.I grew up in Dutchess County, New York, and like most places there were quite a few supposedly “haunted” buildings begging for a closer look. Hudson River State hospital, one of the first places I went to on my own, was one of them. My friends and I used to drive around the campus late at night trying to scare each other. It was then that my interest in abandoned buildings evolved into a vehicle for artistic expression.

I’ve spent ten years composing photographic obituaries for once-thriving buildings that are now crumbled and forgotten. My hope for my work is that it will shine light on beautiful, dated architecture and on the equal yet sinister beauty in decay.

Matt Lambros

malformalady:

A disused escalator coming up out of the central Leeds ex-underpass is collapsing and being colonized by moss.

malformalady:

A disused escalator coming up out of the central Leeds ex-underpass is collapsing and being colonized by moss.

nythroughthelens:

Urban decay on Canal Street. Chinatown, New York City.
New York City changes and evolves at a rapid pace. In certain areas, changes occur faster than others. Lower Manhattan is one place that has changed the most in the last decade. Development happens fast and the current trends are extremely tall buildings constructed mostly of glass, chain stores and luxury boutiques. In neighborhoods that were once bohemian and home to artists and rebels, these current changes have been hard to swallow for long-time residents who run the risk of being out-priced out of the neighborhoods they have called home for decades.
Despite these changes, there are still parts of lower Manhattan that recall earlier decades. New York City suffered economically in the 1970s and it was during this decade that much of lower Manhattan was transformed into a danger zone full of abandoned lots and buildings and rampant crime. Having grown up in New York City in the 1980s and early 1990s, I have vivid memories of riding graffiti-covered trains from Queens into Manhattan. I was taught to ‘watch my back’ at all times since everyone seemed to know someone who had been mugged. Things were still different in those days prior to the initiatives by mayors Koch and Guiliani to ‘clean up’ the city (and discourse is still rampant regarding how they handled it).
When I came across this section of Canal Street initially, my heart almost leaped out of my chest. Here I was staring at a section of a spot in Chinatown that seemed as if it had been dipped in 1980s New York City and had become frozen in time (thankfully I had my camera). It’s hard to put into words how powerful this scene is for me personally. It’s a bit like staring at something that once existed in a distant life.
A city may change rapidly discarding pieces of itself, but it’s the people who carry it’s broken pieces with them in their hearts who imbue the city with its memory.
—-
View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page
—-
Buy “In Another Place and Time - Chinatown - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

nythroughthelens:

Urban decay on Canal Street. Chinatown, New York City.

New York City changes and evolves at a rapid pace. In certain areas, changes occur faster than others. Lower Manhattan is one place that has changed the most in the last decade. Development happens fast and the current trends are extremely tall buildings constructed mostly of glass, chain stores and luxury boutiques. In neighborhoods that were once bohemian and home to artists and rebels, these current changes have been hard to swallow for long-time residents who run the risk of being out-priced out of the neighborhoods they have called home for decades.

Despite these changes, there are still parts of lower Manhattan that recall earlier decades. New York City suffered economically in the 1970s and it was during this decade that much of lower Manhattan was transformed into a danger zone full of abandoned lots and buildings and rampant crime. Having grown up in New York City in the 1980s and early 1990s, I have vivid memories of riding graffiti-covered trains from Queens into Manhattan. I was taught to ‘watch my back’ at all times since everyone seemed to know someone who had been mugged. Things were still different in those days prior to the initiatives by mayors Koch and Guiliani to ‘clean up’ the city (and discourse is still rampant regarding how they handled it).

When I came across this section of Canal Street initially, my heart almost leaped out of my chest. Here I was staring at a section of a spot in Chinatown that seemed as if it had been dipped in 1980s New York City and had become frozen in time (thankfully I had my camera). It’s hard to put into words how powerful this scene is for me personally. It’s a bit like staring at something that once existed in a distant life.

A city may change rapidly discarding pieces of itself, but it’s the people who carry it’s broken pieces with them in their hearts who imbue the city with its memory.

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “In Another Place and Time - Chinatown - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Abandoned swimming pool, England
superthread

Abandoned swimming pool, England

superthread

superthread:

Stenigot by Tom Parkes

Abandoned World War II radar station, Stenigot, England

superthread:

Stenigot by Tom Parkes

Abandoned World War II radar station, Stenigot, England

superthread:

Nocton Hall by Tom Parkes

Derelict Nocton Hall, Lincolnshire, England

superthread:

Nocton Hall by Tom Parkes

Derelict Nocton Hall, Lincolnshire, England

Derelict mansion
Submitted by superthread

Derelict mansion

Submitted by superthread

Abandoned Riverside Hospital, North Brother Island, New York

Abandoned Riverside Hospital, North Brother Island, New York

Abandoned Riverside Hospital, North Brother Island, New York

Abandoned Riverside Hospital, North Brother Island, New York

Abandoned Riverside Hospital, North Brother Island, New York

Abandoned Riverside Hospital, North Brother Island, New York